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Students, teachers work to abolish hate speak

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Students, teachers work to abolish hate speak

Students pledge to stop themselves from using mean slang. Photo by Brandon Owiesny.

Students pledge to stop themselves from using mean slang. Photo by Brandon Owiesny.

Students pledge to stop themselves from using mean slang. Photo by Brandon Owiesny.

Students pledge to stop themselves from using mean slang. Photo by Brandon Owiesny.

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Stupid. Fat. Ugly. Gay. Dumb. Weird. Sticks and stones may break many bones, but words can shatter a heart into a million pieces. School can be the land of the unkind.

Racial, religious, sexual orientation, gender, intellect and status slurs are the property of bullies and mean girls and should be erased.

“Slurs put people down for no reason,” Dayton Porter ‘20 said. “I think that when people use those words, it makes others feel inhuman. But we all are humans just trying to get by. The internet also has a part in this because it has made the words seem like a joke, even though they are not. We should all try to avoid hurtful words.”

Slurs have a meaning, but it seems to have lost impact because of age.

“People use slurs like the ‘R’ word [a derogatory term about people with intellectual and developmental limitations] as a nickname for a friend,” Mary Finkel ‘18 said. “People should have a common respect for everyone around them. I do not think it should be used at all and there should be harsher punishments for those who use slurs in school.”

Words can be very hurtful, especially if those words are demeaning and attack a specific group of people. For every kind action, a bully or mean girl does their worst.

“Hurtful words can ruin a person’s day,” Zack Nicoletti ‘19 said. “These words should not be used because people cannot control how they are born. To use a word that hurts them is completely unacceptable. It not only hurts others, but it also hurts me personally because I do not want to see people upset at all.”

Teachers act to stop these hurtful words from spreading.

“I am appalled by them and I wish they did not exist,” said Kristen Khamis, AP psychology teacher. “I think there should be a harsher consequence. In my classroom, it is not tolerated. I have given Saturday school for inappropriate language and I think some other teachers have as well.”

Peers even question those around them, and how they see themselves.

“People should step back and think of what they say,” Victor Kotulski ‘18 said. “If people were asked, ‘What side of the [character] fence would people say you are on,’ people would often put themselves on the good side of the fence. However, they cannot hide from their past or their conscience if they [are people who use] slurs. They cannot take those words back because they have already done their damage.”

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Students, teachers work to abolish hate speak